Put in the work, see the results.

Sled work is programmed quite often for our high school athletes; as well as our CrossFit members, and for good reason. If you want to build some strength and cardio endurance outside of the daily WOD; but don’t want to end up with extensive muscle soreness for days that effects the rest of your lower body lifts, sleds are a fantastic resource. We have a large group training for the Rugged Red who will see sled work programmed on a regular basis. Jason Brown is a pioneer in the conjugated CrossFit method and expands on this.

“Conditioning work does not have to be boring, nor does it have to beat you up. General physical preparedness (GPP) work can add value to your training sessions and also break up the monotony. GPP-based conditioning will allow you to enhance recovery and build your base, making you more able to tolerate higher volume and recover from your other training sessions. The purpose of your GPP work can be multifaceted, and thus serve multiple purposes if implemented into a well-developed training plan.

Sled work fits the bill perfectly for these purposes. This type of work is perfect for individuals who:

  1. …want to shred body fat.
  2. …are on a training regimen, but want additional work that won’t take away from the objectives of their current training plan.
  3. …want to improve their conditioning both anaerobically and aerobically.
  4. …want to spice up their current training regiment without feeling run-down.

Let’s talk about how to incorporate sled work into your training schedule so that it doesn’t interfere with your current training program, while still allowing you to improve your conditioning in a balanced manner. First off, we are going to implement this conditioning in a manner that allows us to work all three energy systems. These sessions will have at least 48 hours of recovery between each session.” – Jason Brown

So next class, if you want to push yourself a bit more, stay after and do a lap around with a sled. We promise, you’ll see better results over time.

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